Sultai 2.0 - A Modern Take

By Dilan Schulte, the Sultai guy

When Bloodbraid Elf was unbanned, a lot people (myself included) thought Jund would shoot back up to tier 1. How wrong I was—but then again, modern has long been a format of dark horse brews becoming public enemies. Remember when people thought KCI was a brew, or when Mardu midrange decks were a fever dream? I guess we can’t feel too bad for Jund; it spent so long at the top of the heap, and—in my opinion—is still a fine midrange deck. But I’m not a Jund player, I’m a devotee of its weird cousin, Sultai.

The problems with Sultai:
To the uninitiated, Sultai is oft maligned as an unplayable wedge in modern because the cards create tension with themselves. Jim Davis has repeatedly commented on his stream that playing discard is tempo negative—in that you tap mana to 1-for-1 your opponent—while counter magic is tempo positive—you pay usually 1-3 mana to deal with something usually cast on your opponent’s turn that likely costs more. Tempo-negative decks usually want to close out the game quickly—like Jund—by shredding the hand and jamming some beefy threats before an opponent can recover. The logic then follows that making your opponent discard and then following up with the possibility of a logic knot or mana leak is bad, because you’re losing the opportunity to apply pressure that your discard momentarily bought you. Jeff Hoogland also notes that delve creatures, while useful, eat up your graveyard, which Snapcaster Mage and Tarmogoyf utilize.

Some counter-arguments to Sultai Being Bad:
These are valid criticisms of the BUG color scheme, but they don’t necessarily mean that the wedge is unplayable. For example, Grixis Death’s Shadow runs counters and discard in abundance, as well as Snapcaster Mage and Gurmag Anglers to boot. Granted, that deck had fallen from grace somewhat, but that doesn’t mean it still isn’t a contender in the modern scene; Ben Friedman certainly continues to do damage with the archetype. Before the unbanning of Jace, the Mindsculptor, I was running a similar Sultai list to one played by BUG brewmaster, Gerard Fabiano.

You can check out his video here: https://www.channelfireball.com/videos/channel-gfabs-modern-sultai-midrange/

And here’s the list for reference:

Maindeck:
3 Blooming Marsh
1 Breeding Pool
3 Darkslick Shores
1 Forest
1 Island
3 Misty Rainforest
1 Overgrown Tomb
2 Polluted Delta
1 Swamp
2 Verdant Catacombs
2 Watery Grave

4 Serum Visions
2 Thought Scour
3 Fatal Push
3 Inquisition of Kozilek
2 Thoughtseize
2 Abrupt Decay

2 Maelstrom Pulse
2 Search for Azcanta
1 Bitterblossom

2 Engineered Explosives

2 Jace, Vryn's Prodigy
2 Snapcaster Mage
2 Scavenging Ooze
4 Tarmogoyf

1 Tasigur, the Golden Fang
2 Gurmag Angler

2 Liliana of the Veil
2 Liliana, the Last Hope

Sideboard:
3 Ceremonious Rejection
2 Dispel
1 Surgical Extraction
2 Nihil Spellbomb
2 Disdainful Stroke
1 Ashiok, Nightmare Weaver
2 Fulminator Mage
2 Thragtusk

This deck showcases some of the things splashing blue brings to the table. For one, Thought Scour enables quick delve creatures and Jace, Vryn’s Prodigy flips, while also potentially growing your Goyfs (Bitterblossom and EE in the graveyard!?). Moreover, blue gives you an effective late game in the form of Jace, Snapcaster and Search for Azcanta. Lastly, your sideboard gives you access to a silver-bullet suite of counter magic should you need it against colorless decks, big-mana decks and burn decks (in the form of dispel). Notice that Fabiano chooses to wisely relegate all counter-shenanigans to the board so as to avoid tensions unless necessary. Playing a Thoughtseize into a Goyf and then into another Goyf while holding up rejection isn’t a winning strategy against many decks, but it certainly slaughters Tron and KCI. 

Personally, I didn’t like Search in the list (more on this later), so I swapped out both copies for Grim Flayers—who added extra card filtering and a slightly faster clock. I also traded Bitterblossom and one copy of Engineered Explosives for two Collective Brutality to sure up my creature and burn matches a bit more.

jace.jpg

What to do now that Jace, the Mind Sculptor is unbanned:
Satisfied with a modified Fabiano build of Sultai Midrange, I was initially bummed out at the news of Jace’s unbanning. Sure, he gave Sultai a new toy, but BBE was historically his predator, and she was released too. Moreover, I wasn’t sure if Sultai would even be a good shell for the planeswalker, because Sultai was more of a midrange deck and Jace excelled in decks that could protect him (usually with counters) thereby allowing him to bury the opponent in card advantage, ala most Legacy decks. As it would turn out, UW and Jeskai didn’t want Jace as bad as they wanted Teferi, the Hero of Dominaria (though some lists still make room), and Sultai can protect Jace with the proper tools.

Here is the list I am currently running:

Maindeck:
3 Snapcaster Mage
4 Tarmogoyf
2 Tasigur, the Golden Fang

3 Liliana of the Veil
2 Liliana, the Last Hope
2 Jace, the Mind Sculptor

4 Fatal Push
4 Inquisition of Kozilek
4 Serum Visions
4 Thoughtseize
2 Abrupt Decay
2 Maelstrom Pulse
2 Spreading Seas

2 Blooming Marsh
1 Breeding Pool
4 Creeping Tar Pit
1 Forest
1 Island
2 Misty Rainforest
1 Overgrown Tomb
4 Polluted Delta
2 Swamp
3 Verdant Catacombs
1 Watery Grave

Sideboard:
2 Collective Brutality
2 Distainful Stroke
2 Fulminator Mage
1 Damnation
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
4 Leyline of the Void
2 Obstinate Baloth
1 Nissa, Vital Force

 

The Deck Building Choices

Lots of Planeswalkers:
This choice is the backbone of the deck. 7 maindeck planeswalkers is something most opponents aren’t ready for. Furthermore, they complement each other. Liliana of the Veil shreds hands while Jace refills yours, breaking the symmetry. Jace also bounces problematic creatures (the ones that your copious removal and Lili’s edict effects don’t deal with) and manipulates the top of the library while Liliana, the Last Hope machine guns weenies away and threatens to win with an ultimate. The deck’s cornucopia of walkers is especially strong against control considering the next factor, which is . . .

Tons and Tons of discard:
A full 4 Thoughtseize and 4 Inquisition are required to eviscerate your opponent’s hand as early as possible thereby ensuring you can start gaining value with walkers. More often than not, I’ve played games like this: T1: Inquisition, T2: Thoughtseize, Serum Visions (or Fatal Push), T3: Snap, Inquisition again (or Liliana of the Veil). T4: Liliana or Jace. Be aggressive with your discard, and fetch according to your matchup to preserve your life. Losing a ton of life against Tron or KCI means practically nothing, but be very careful against bolt decks. We do run 4 basics after all.

Lots of ways to remove things:
If you count Snapcasters (who can buy back removal) and planeswalker abilities, you have 18 cards that can remove things main deck. The numbers of Abrupt Decay can be adjusted depending on how many Ensnaring Bridges and Blood Moons you want to destroy. Often, heavy removal and heavy discard means you can clear the way for Jace fairly soon.

Only 9 creatures:
4 Goyf, 3 Snap, 2 Tasigur are all you get in the way of main deck creatures. This puts your opponent in a precarious situation. Here’s why: Push is good against Goyf, but “meh” against Snap and dead against Tasigur. Path to Exile is good against both Goyf and Tasigur, but ramps you, and you’re a little bigger than your average midrange deck anyway, so this is especially helpful. Bolt is weak against everything, except a Creeping Tar Pit and a fresh Jace who chooses to brainstorm (so if you suspect a Bolt, Fate Seal first). Thus in game 1, you will often win by out valuing your opponent with walkers while removal often sits dead in their hand. Post board, your opponent will sub out a lot of removal (making Goyf better) or leave it in and still be weak to your walkers. You will still sometimes ride a Goyf or two to victory, Jund style, due to discard and your ability to get them back with Liliana, the Last Hope, and having a clock is very important for some matchups like Storm, KCI, Infect and Tron, where Jace is not the greatest.

No counter spells maindeck:
The pros are right, don’t give into the tensions of black and blue. Play like a Jund deck that can draw cards like a blue deck, and only board in counter magic when you really need it. Times when you really need it include Tron, Titanshift, KCI and Turbo Turns. An argument could be made also against certain control decks that run a lot of 4+ drops, such as Cryptic Command, Teferi and Jace, the Mindsculptor, like UW control.

No Scavenging Ooze or Tireless Tracker:
This is by far the biggest sacrifice you make when playing a deck like this. Ooze and Tracker are amazing, and are the driving force behind GB rock shells. Ooze cleans up opposing graveyards against value decks (like Mardu Pyromancer and anything with Snapcaster) as well as graveyard decks (Hollow One, Dredge, Reanimator and slow-starting Bridgevine decks) while keeping you alive against Burn and Humans and simultaneously growing into a game-ending threat. Tracker is a better source of card advantage than almost thing else in modern and also grows into a game-ending threat. So why am I not running these? Simple: only 14 green-mana sources means that Ooze likely won’t be used efficiently, and only 22 lands means Tracker won’t get the same value she’d reap in a GB or Jund shell that runs 25. More often than not, I’m using Serum Visions to scry lands to the bottom after I hit my 3rd or 4th land drop (it’s context dependent of course). Tracker turns dead draws into redraws while growing, and you already have enough ways to filter you dead draws away (Jace + Fetchlands, Serum Visions and discarding stuff to Liliana of the Veil), which means Tracker is not very good in this deck. That said, with a little tweaking, she probably could be.  

No Search for Azcanta:
Search for Azcanta is a very good magic card, but I believe it’s all wrong in this shell. Here’s why: Search provides inevitability through card advantage in draw-go style decks. You can hold up some mana on your opponent’s turn in a deck that runs Cryptic Command and then if they play nothing worth countering, you punish them by tapping and netting another spell. In Sultai, you’re almost always playing at sorcery speed, so you would have to waste a turn to “search” for a haymaker, as opposed to UW or Jeskai which can hold up a counter, a Snapcaster or a Vendilion Clique and then decide to “search” on an opponent’s end step if none of these are needed.

2 Tasigur over 2 Gurmag Angler:
This deck grinds a lot, so I feel Tasigur’s ability is more useful than 5 power. There are situations where it is correct to play a 1-mana Tasigur, delve out most or all of your graveyard and then activate before your next turn. Moreover, the less graveyard types you can eat the better it is for Tarmogoyf, so delve as the situation dictates.

4 Creeping Tar Pit:
With a Goyf and a Tar Pit you will be able to close out the game fast. Moreover, Tar Pit is sweeper resistant and an amazing way to pressure opposing planeswalkers.

2 Spreading Seas? But they are so bad!:
True, they are, but they’re not as bad here. Here, Seas is another answer to flipped Search for Azcanta and manlands (cantripping to deal with a Colonnade or Ravine feels good), a potential mana screw against certain decks (but this won’t happen that often) and maindeck hate against Tron. Post board against Tron, you have quick pressure in Goyf, loads of disruption, Disdainful Stroke, Seas and 2-3 Fulminator Mage which you can buyback with Liliana, the Last Hope. Nut draws like Thoughtseize into Goyf, into Seas, into Fulminator Mage is just light out for big mana decks, especially since you’re likely to up the pressure with a Snapcaster or Tar Pit as the game progresses. You will board this out a lot though, which is fine because then you can bring in other silver bullets.

Disdainful Stroke as the counter of choice in the SB:
Stroke does what you want, which is preventing your opponents from going over top of you, at least momentarily. Stroke comes in against any deck that intends to tap out for big mana and kill you, like Tron and Scapeshift/Titanshift. If things get too colorless (I’m talking to you, Affinity and Eldrazi), you could make room for Ceremonious Rejection by cutting something like Nissa, Vital Force and/or Kalitas.

4 Leyline of the Void:
As of the writing of this article, Bridgevine, Hollow One and KCI are popular unfair decks that rely heavily on the graveyard and Mardu Pyromancer is the midrange choice for most fair players. Leyline in the opener hoses all of these while hitting fringe stuff as well. It’s worth it. If it is not worth it in your meta, sub in 2 Nihil Spellbombs and 2 Surgical Extractions instead.

2 Obstinate Baloth:
These lil’ guys have done work for me. Playing against an opponent who plays Kolaghan’s Command and/or Liliana of the Veil? Gotcha! Playing against Hollow One? Surprise sucker, your Burning Inquiry just netted me life, card advantage and board state! When Baloth isn’t a sneaky silver bullet, its much-needed life gain against aggro decks and Burn.

1 Kalitas and 1 Nissa, Why?:
Perhaps I’m being too cute here. These are definitely the flexi-slots and you could run a more streamlined approach by replacing a Kalitas with another Collective Brutality and Nissa with another Stroke or Fulminator Mage. Heck, these could even be the Ceremonious Rejection spots your hypothetical KCI, Affinity Eldrazi meta demands. My meta, however, has a surplus of Jund, Humans, UW, Jeskai, Burn players and even the odd Merfolk and Grixis control devotee. Kalitas is amazing against creature decks and a stabilizing force against Burn. If you need to stabilize against these kinds of decks, Kalitas is a nice top end. Nissa conversely, comes in against removal heavy decks that looking to two-for-one you (like Jund and UW). She has high starting loyalty, threatens to ultimate in 1 turn and gives you access to hasty 5/5s. How does it feel to play a Nissa and kill an opposing planeswalker? It feels great.

Only 1 Damnation:
If I had more slots, I would be running more sweepers, but between Kalitas, Baloth, both Lilianas, Brutality, Push, Decay, Maelstrom Pulse, Jace bounces and Snapcaster rebuys, I feel that more creature removal is not as needed as the other things in the board. Still, if you feel differently, cut something expensive (like Nissa, as she’s good against something like Jeskai or Jund but bad against Humans) and replace it with another Damnation (or Languish, or even Flaying Tendrils depending on what you expect to see). 

Bonus section. Cards I am exploring:

Vendilion Clique:
The advantage of running Vendilion Clique is that it can provide flying pressure and disruption (or maybe filtering if you really need it) at instant speed and this is something which is especially relevant against big-mana decks which don’t interact. That said, you are not holding up counter magic (that often) and Clique does not net you card advantage. Ask yourself, would you rather be playing a planeswalker, a Snapcaster into a kill spell or disruption, a Fulminator or even just a Thoughtseize and a Goyf on turn three, or this? For me, the answer has been any of the former options, and so Clique stays benched here, although, again, like Search for Azcanta they are good in Jeskai and UW.

Jace, Vryn’s Prodigy:
First of all, cool. But is this better here than Snapcaster? Granted, if he lives you will get more value out of him. But he’s also slower, and there could be a turn where Snap + Push keeps you alive and summoning-sick Jace gets you dead. Depending on your meta, I could see him working. Test at your own discretion.

Thrun, the Last Troll (or Carnage Tyrant):
Again, cool, but isn’t Nissa better in this spot? Their “uncounterability” is seldom relevant because you run so much disruption (and this includes Brutality out of the board). Moreover, Terminus is popular right now, and Liliana of the Veil is still played quite a bit. Thrun (and Tyrant) eat it to both of these cards and Nissa dodges both. Thrun also gets chumped for days, whereas Nissa threatens to ultimate while applying pressure. Tyrant tramples, but 6 mana…

Languish instead of Damnation:
I’ve already done this a few times and loved it. Here’s why I loved it:

1. Languish does not kill your Tasigurs and Goyfs but likely hits all creature decks. Clear away 2-3 humans and keep your Goyf. Sweet.
2. This gets around Selfless Spirit. UW Spirits is becoming a thing, as are Bant Spirits. Moreover, Chord decks, like Elves and GW Valuetown, run Selfless Spirit, and often you’ll get got if you cast Damnation, then they chord or Collective Company and sac a spirit and all their stuff lives.
3. This kills Hazoret the Fervent. Mardu Pyromancer and some creative Jund players will run Hazoret and Hazoret is really hard for this deck to deal with. Languish answers her no problem.
4. Players who don’t know what you’re up to are really, really unlikely to name Languish with a Meddling Mage.

Golgari Charm:
I’ve run this from time to time because this card is really good. It clears away tokens (Lingering Souls is annoying, Pyromancer can get out of hand, Storm can Empty the Warrens, and big-mana Secure the Wastes can happen), it “counters” Supreme Verdict and it can destroy Search for Azcanta and Leyline of Sanctity. If these things are a problem for you, swap out a flex card in the SB and add this in.

Thragtusk:
This is often just as good as Nissa, so in matchups where life matters more than grinding (although Tusk still grinds real good), play this.

Sideboarding Guide:

Vs. Burn

Out

4 Thoughtseize
1 Maelstrom Pulse
2 Liliana, the Last Hope

In

2 Collective Brutality
2 Obstinate Baloth
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
2 Fulminator Mage

Tip: Brutality is your friend. Even if a Goyf gets pathed, drawing into one of your life-gaining 4-drops often wins you the game if you’ve fetched responsibly. 

Vs. Humans

Out

4 Thoughtseize
2 Spreading Seas

In

2 Collective Brutality
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
1 Damnation
2 Obstinate Baloth

Tip: Keep removal-heavy hands. Tasigur is bad here, and he would come out if we had more to bring in. If you keep them off balance and then land a planeswalker, you should be fine.

Vs. Storm

Out

2 Spreading Seas
2 Liliana, the Last Hope
2 Jace, the Mindsculptor

In

4 Leyline of the Void
2 Collective Brutality

Tip: Disrupt. Jam Goyf. Win. You should usually crush this matchup.

Vs. Ad Nauseam

Out

4 Fatal Push

In:

2 Brutality
2 Disdainful Stroke

Tip: Not much to change here. Your disruption, Decays and Pulses should allow you to destroy their Phyrexian Unlifes and keep them off their combo. Stroke hits the deck’s namesake card and also maybe Grave Titan if they board it in. Leyline of Sanctity is the only real way you lose, so things like Golgari Charm are worth considering if you face this matchup a lot.

Vs. Tron

Out:

4 Push
1-2 Decay (do you think you’re going to kill an Expedition Map or Oblivion Stone? If you’re on the draw, probably not)

In:

2 Disdainful Stroke
2 Fulminator Mage
1-2 Collective Brutality (how much Abrupt Decay did you cut?)

Tip: This can get dicey if you keep the wrong hand. Ideally, you disrupt into Goyf, into Seas, into Fulminator, into buyback Fulminator with Liliana, the Last Hope and win, but this doesn’t always happen. Tar Pit and Brutality can provide the last points of damage. Again, if this is a common matchup for you, cut Kalitas and/or Nissa for more Stroke and Mage or even Rejection (although Tron is running Thragtusk now).

Vs. Scapeshift and Titanshift

Out

4 Fatal Push
2 Liliana of the Veil or Abrupt Decay (Decay stays in if they play Prismatic Omen)

In

2 Disdainful Stroke
2 Fulminator Mage
2 Collective Brutality (this can take ramp and Scapeshift)

Tip: This will play out much the same as a Tron game. If you draw your SB early, you’ll likely beat them to death with Goyf while shredding their hand. With practice, this can happen quite a bit, as you’ll know when to hold them and know when to fold them. You will also get a lot of millage out of Serum Visions. Victory is not guaranteed however, and there will be some games where you’ll keep a hand that seems “OK,” and then just die. Beware ticking up with Liliana of the Veil, as these guys also board in Obstinate Baloth.

Vs. Amulet Titan

Out

2 Spreading Seas
4 Fatal Push

In

2 Fulminator Mage
2 Disdainful Stroke
2 Collective Brutality

Tip: I don’t like Seas that much here because this deck tends to go off, and then it’s already too late. Better to hit their hands and also to destroy the titular Amulet of Vigor with Abrupt Decay.

 Vs Mardu Pyromancer and Grixis Midrange/Control

Out

3 Fatal Push
2 Spreading Seas
4 Thoughtseize

In:

4 Leyline of the Void
2 Obstinate Baloth
1 Nissa, Vital Force
2 Collective Brutality

Tip: If you land a Leyline on turn zero, you are heavily favored to win. Pyromancer NEEDS that graveyard, and both decks will not see Baloth coming. Liliana, the Last Hope cleans up Lingering Souls and Pyromancers, so it’s OK to cut out 3-4 Pushes, as these don’t hit Anglers and Bedlam Revelers.

Vs. Grixis Death’s Shadow

Out

2 Spreading Seas
4 Thoughtseize or Inquisition (or some mix of the two; dealers choice)
1-2: Liliana, the Last Hope (unless they run Pyromancer or Souls)

In:

4 Leyline of the Void
2 Baloth
1 Nissa (Maybe, but probably not)

Tip: Push kills Shadow, so we keep that in, but Leyline still prevents Angler from coming down, so we need to make room for it. People also still get got by surprise Baloth off their discard spells, especially K-Command. Jace can bounce Angler if needed.

Vs. KCI

Out

2 Spreading Seas
2-4 Fatal Push
0-2 Liliana, the Last Hope

In

4 Leyline of the Void
2 Disdainful Stroke
0-2 Fulminator Mage

Tip: Stopping KCI from ever coming down with stroke and/or nuking their graveyard does a lot after you are already shredding their hand. Sai, Master Thopterist can be annoying, so disrupt accordingly. Also, don’t forget, they likely have 4 Nature’s Claim coming in post board. Blowing up their lands with Fulminator can buy you time if you’ve got them hellbent, but they’ll draw their way out of it, so you’ll need to be applying pressure early.

Vs. GW Valuetown and Martyr Proc-Style Decks

Out:

2 Spreading Seas
2 Inquisition of Kozilek
4 Thoughtseize

In:

1 Damnation
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
4 Leyline of the Void
2 Collective Brutality

Tip: Just grind these guys into oblivion. If you have enough removal, you should have no trouble 1-for-1ing them with a Leyline or Kalitas in play.

Vs. Bridgevine

Out

2 Spreading Seas
1 Jace, the Mindsculptor
4 Thoughtseize
2 Inquisition of Kozilek

In

4 Leyline of the Void
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
2 Obstinate Baloth
2 Collective Brutality

Tip: Leyline kills them. Board in lifegain on the off chance you fetch greedily and then get goblin bushwacked and need to survive.

Vs. Hollow One

Out

2 Spreading Seas
4 Thoughtseize
4 Inquisition

In

4 Leyline of the Void
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
2 Obstinate Baloth
2 Collective Brutality
1 Damnation

Tip: Hollow One plays a lot like Bridgevine, but you may actually have to interact a bit before you win, so the planeswalkers stay in. Baloth is a “gotcha” card here, and Leyline will shut down all but their best draws. 

Vs. UW Control and Jeskai

Out:

2 Spreading Seas
3-4 Fatal Push
1-2 Tarmogoyf

In

2 Collective Brutality
0-2 Disdainful Stroke
1 Nissa, Vital Force
2 Fulminator Mage
0-2 Obstinate Baloth

Tip: This is not an easy win, but it’s also not stacked against you. Heavy disruption plus 8 planeswalkers plus being able to recur Fulminator Mage should keep you safe. Disdainful Stroke is surprisingly good against UW, as it hits Teferi, the Angels, Cryptic Command, Terminus and Jace, and you usually don’t have to worry about a counter war due to your heavy amounts of hand disruption. Baloth is your friend against Jeskai (being burned out sucks) but pretty bad against UW. Moreover, you may not need as many Strokes against Jeskai (or any for that matter), as their threat base tends to be lower to the ground. Remember, Goyf is resistant to bolts, but bad against paths.

Vs Infect:

Out

2 Jace, the Mindsculptor
2 Maelstrom Pulse

In

2 Collective Brutality
2 Fulminator Mage

Tips: Not much to say here. Be careful, don’t tap out unless you have to after turn 2. Kill their stuff dead. Spreading seas hits Inkmoth. Jace and Pulse are too slow.

Vs Affinity (with Hardened Scales or otherwise)

Out

4 Thoughtseize
2 Jace, the Mindsculptor

In

2 Collective Brutality
1 Damnation
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
2 Fulminator Mage

Tips: Here is the one matchup where Ceremonious Rejection would do so much work (but then again, so would more sweepers or Abrupt Decays). This matchup isn’t great for you, but it’s far from unwinnable. You have the tools to kill anything they throw at you, you just need to leverage them properly and apply pressure.

Vs. Jund

Out

4 Inquisition of Kozilek
4 Thoughtseize

In

2 Collective Brutality
2 Fulminator Mage
2 Obstinate Baloth
1 Nissa, Vital Force
1 Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet

Tips: You’re just cutting discard which can’t attack the top of the library for value. Pretty simple. Often, you will grind them down. Sometimes you won’t. It’s a midrange mirror that’s a little harder for you to completely hate out. That Baloth though. . .

Vs. Bogles

Out

2 Spreading Seas

In

1 Damnation
1 Collective Brutality

Tips: Again, Languish or Golgari Charm would likely be better here, but hey, what are you going to do? Here’s what you do. Keep hands with Decay, Pulse and Liliana of the Veil. Keep in Fatal Push to kill Dryad Arbor and Kor Spirit Dancer.

Closing Remarks:

And there you have it Sultai fans, a comprehensive guide to a Sultai deck. Is there anything I missed? I welcome feedback and suggestions.